Zoography; Or, The Beauties of Nature Displayed. In Select Descriptions from the Animal, and Vegetable, with Additions from the Mineral Kingdom: Systematical Arranged, Volume 1

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Cadell and Davies,in the Strand, 1807
 

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Page 513 - Part loosely wing the region: part more wise, In common rang'd in figure, wedge their way, Intelligent of seasons, and set forth Their airy caravan, high over seas Flying, and over lands, with mutual wing Easing their flight. So steers the prudent crane Her annual voyage, borne on winds ; • The air floats as they pass, fann'd with unnumber'd plumes.
Page 485 - Silence accompanied; for beast and bird— They to their grassy couch, these to their nests— Were slunk, all but the wakeful nightingale, She all night long her amorous descant sung. The
Page 467 - which leaveth her eggs in the earth, and warmeth them in the dust; and forgetteth that the foot may crush them, or that the wild beast may break them. She is hardened against her young ones as though they were not hers: her labour is in vain without fear; because God has deprived her of wisdom, neither hath he imparted to her understanding.
Page 541 - broken pieces of old and bruised ships, some whereof have been cast thither by shipwracke, and also the trunks and bodies with the branches of old and rotten trees, cast up there likewise; whereon is found a certain spume or froth that in time breedeth into certain shells, in shape like those of a
Page 517 - Who bid the stork, Columbus like, explore Heavens not his own, and worlds unknown before ? Who calls the council, states the certain day, Who forms the phalanx, and who points the way ? POPE. THE migration of birds
Page 484 - Sweet bird, that shunn'st the noise of folly, Most musical, most melancholy! Thee, chauntress, oft the woods among I woo, to hear thy even song.
Page 435 - birds usually sit. The saw was applied to the trunk, the wedges were inserted into the opening, the woods echoed to the heavy blows of the beetle or mallet, the tree nodded to its fall; but still the dam persisted to sit. At last when it gave way the bird was
Page 342 - It would take flies out of a person's hand; if you gave it any thing to eat, it brought its wings round before the mouth, hovering and hiding its head, in the manner of birds of prey when they feed. The adroitness it showed in shearing off the wings of flies, which -were always
Page 13 - in Staffordshire. The principal external appearances which distinguish this breed of cattle from all others are the following: their colour is invariably white; muzzles black ; the whole of the inside of the ear, and about one-third of the outside, from the tip downwards, red ; horns white, with black tips, very fine, and bent upwards. Some
Page 541 - But what our eyes have seene, and hands have touched, we shall declare. There is a small island in Lancashire, called the Pile of Foulders, wherein are found broken pieces of old and bruised ships, some whereof have been cast thither by shipwracke, and also the trunks and bodies with the branches of old and rotten trees, cast up there likewise;

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