The book for training children

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Page 34 - Woe unto you. scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye are like unto whited sepulchres, which outwardly appear beautiful, but inwardly are full of dead men's bones, and of all uncleanness.
Page 34 - Woe unto you, Scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye are like unto whited sepulchres, which indeed appear beautiful outward, but are within full of dead men's bones, and of all uncleanness.
Page 125 - Frivolous curiosity about trifles, and a laborious attention to little objects, which neither require nor deserve a moment's thought, lower a man ; who from thence is thought (and not unjustly) incapable of greater matters. Cardinal de Retz, very sagaciously, marked out Cardinal Chigi* for a little mind, from the moment that he told him he had wrote three years with the same pen, and that it was an excellent good one still.
Page 47 - Even a child is known by his doings, whether his work be pure, and whether it be right.
Page 126 - But that ease and freedom have their bounds too, which must by no means be violated. A certain degree of negligence and carelessness becomes injurious and insulting from the real or supposed inferiority of the persons ; and that delightful liberty of conversation among a few friends is soon destroyed, as liberty often has been, by being carried to licentiousness.
Page 1 - ... that the art of the statuary only clears away the superfluous matter, and removes the rubbish. The figure is in the stone, and the sculptor only finds it. What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to a human soul.
Page 1 - I consider a human soul' without education like marble in the quarry, which shows none of its inherent beauties, until the skill of the polisher fetches out the colours, makes the surface shine, and discovers every ornamental cloud, spot, and vein that runs through the body of it.
Page 45 - The rod and reproof give wisdom ; but a child left to himself, bringeth his mother to shame.
Page 56 - Certainly the ablest men that ever were have had all an openness and frankness of dealing, and a name of certainty and veracity : but then they were like horses well managed, for they could tell passing well when to stop...
Page 121 - Great talents, such as honour, virtue, learning, and parts, are above the generality of the world ; who neither possess them themselves, nor judge of them rightly in others ; but all people are judges...

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