The Teacher and the Parent: A Treatise Upon Common-school Education; Containing Practical Suggestions to Teachers and Parents

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Jenks, Hickling, & Swan, 1853 - 327 pages
 

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Page 141 - They also that dwell in the uttermost parts are afraid at thy tokens: thou makest the outgoings of the morning and evening to rejoice. '' ' Thou visitest the earth, and waterest it; thou greatly enrichest it with the river of God, which is full of water; thou preparest them corn, when thou
Page 140 - 0 God of our salvation; who art the confidence of all the ends of the earth, and of them that are afar off upon the sea: " 'Which by his strength setteth fast the mountains being girded with power: " ' Which stilleth the noise of' the seas, the noise of their waves, and the tumult of the people.
Page 79 - pure heaven smiling beyond thee ! Best not content in thy darkness — a clod ! Work, for some good, be it ever so slowly ; Cherish some flower, be it ever so lowly ; Labor ! all labor is noble and holy ; Let thy great deed be thy prayer to thy God.
Page 54 - The Scriptures contain, independently of a divine origin, more true sublimity, more exquisite beauty, purer morality, more important history, and finer strains both of poetry and eloquence, than could be collected, within the same compass, from all other books that were ever composed, in any age or in any idiom.
Page 52 - Sculptors of life are we, as we stand With our soul uncarved before us, Waiting the hour when, at God's command, Our life-dream passes o'er us. If we carve it then on the yielding stone, With many a sharp incision, Its heavenly beauty shall be our own — Our lives that angel-vision.
Page 140 - Which by his strength setteth fast the mountains being girded with power: " ' Which stilleth the noise of' the seas, the noise of their waves, and the tumult of the people.
Page 189 - numbers, Life is but an empty dream ! For the soul is dead that slumbers, And things are not what they seem.
Page 150 - his waistcoat. To remove it, therefore, became expedient, in my eyes; and, in an evil moment, it was removed, with a knife. Great was my anxiety to know the success of my measure ; and it succeeded too well. When the boy was again questioned, his fingers sought,
Page 86 - new impulses, clearer views, and more definite aims and designs. " As iron sharpeneth iron, so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend.
Page 79 - Droop not, though shame, sin and anguish, are round thee ' Bravely fling off the chain that hath bound thee ! Look to yon pure heaven smiling beyond thee ! Best not content in thy darkness — a clod ! Work, for some good, be it ever so slowly ; Cherish some flower, be it ever so lowly ; Labor ! all labor is noble and holy ; Let thy great

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