The Massachusetts Teacher, Volume 3

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1850
 

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Page 204 - T is filled wherever thou dost tread; Nature's self's thy Ganymede. Thou dost drink, and dance, and sing, Happier than the happiest king! All the fields which thou dost see, All the plants belong to thee; Fertile made with early juice. All that summer hours produce,
Page 217 - Nature's great heart. From the dark cloud flows the life-giving shower; From the rough sod blows the soft-breathing flower; From the small insect, the rich coral bower; Only man, in the plan, shrinks from his part. Labor is life ! 'Tis the still water faileth; Idleness
Page 217 - goes up into heaven ! Never the ocean wave falters in flowing; Never the little seed stops in its growing; More and more richly the rose-heart keeps glowing, PAUSE not to dream of the future before us; Pause not to weep the wild cares that come o'er us ; Hark ! how Creation's deep, musical chorus, Till from its nourishing stem it is riven.
Page 204 - Thou dost drink, and dance, and sing, Happier than the happiest king! All the fields which thou dost see, All the plants belong to thee; Fertile made with early juice. All that summer hours produce, Man for thee does sow and plough; Farmer he, and landlord
Page 379 - task." (A common phrase of his.) Pupil. (Making a sort of heavy bolt at his calamity, and never remembering his stop at the word Missionary.) "Missionary Can you see the wind ? " (Master gives him a slap on the cheek.) Pupil. (Raising his voice to a cry, and still forgetting his stop.) "Indian No!
Page 217 - True as a sunbeam the swift sickle guides. Labor is wealth — in the sea the pearl groweth ; Rich the queen's robe from the frail cocoon floweth; From the fine acorn the strong forest bloweth
Page 120 - right disposition; which, if once got, though all the rest should be neglected, would, in due time, produce all the rest; and which, if it be not got, and settled so as to keep out ill and vicious habits, languages and sciences and all the other accomplishments of education, will be to no purpose but to make the worse or more dangerous man. LOCKE.
Page 203 - The bud is budding now for immortality ! Death comes to take me where I long to be; One pang, and bright blooms the immortal flower; Death comes to lead me from mortality, To lands which know not one unhappy hour; I have a hope, a faith — from sorrow here I'm led by death away — why should I start and fear
Page 24 - Thursday.—The Association met, according to adjournment, and was called to order by the President. Prayer was offered by Rev. Dr. Sears. After singing, Mr. Capen, of Dedham, made some remarks upon the character of the late Mr. Seth Littlefield, and offered resolutions upon his death, which, after
Page 376 - THE LOVE OF STUDY. BESIDES the shame of inferiority, and the love of reputation, curiosity is a passion very favorable to the love of study; and a passion very susceptible of increase by cultivation. Sound travels so many feet in a second; and light travels so many feet in a second. Nothing more probable; .but you do not care

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