New Sketches of Every-day Life: A Diary ; Together with Strife and Peace

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Page 94 - ... outward gifts, or the want of them. And who has not experienced of how little consequence they are in fact for the weal or woe of life ? Who has not experienced how, on nearer acquaintance, plainness becomes beautified, and beauty loses its charm, exactly according to the quality of the heart and mind ? And from this cause am I of opinion that the want of outward beauty never disquiets a noble nature or will be regarded as a misfortune. It nevei can prevent people from being amiable and beloved...
Page 189 - Then the dancers rise up and dance, and display themselves in expressions of power, in which strength and dexterity seem to divert themselves by playing with indolence and clumsiness, and to overcome them. The same person who just before seemed fettered to the earth, springs aloft, and throws himself around in the air as though he had wings. Then, after many break-neck movements and evolutions, before which the unaccustomed spectator grows dizzy, the dance suddenly assumes again its first quiet,...
Page 118 - Returned to the company, Susanna found much to notice and much to reflect upon. For the rest, she was through the whole of this day in a sort of mental excitement. It seemed to her, as if she saw the picture of comfort and happiness of which she had sometimes dreamed, here realized.
Page 189 - ... Perhaps there is no dance which expresses more than the Hailing the temper of the people who originated it. It begins, as it were, upon the ground, amid jogging little hops, accompanied by movements of the arms, in which, as it were, a great strength plays negligently. It is somewhat bear-like, indolent, clumsy, halfdreaming. But it wakes, it becomes earnest. Then the dancers rise up and dance, and display themselves in expressions of power, in which strength and dexterity seem to divert themselves...
Page 6 - ... any genius at all, may raise himself above his original position, may mingle with the world of fashion, and hold* himself on a level with the highest ; but this is less easy for him who is engaged. — It* seems as if marriage put the whole world in their proper rank. — Bruyère. A bachelor's life is a splendid breakfast ; a tolerably flat dinner; and a most miserable supper.
Page 96 - And she had then her little darling in her arms, and pressed her to her heart ; then was Susanna happy, and forgot all the cares and the fatigues of the day. At the remembrance of these hours Susanna's tears often flowed, and prevented her remarking the tearful glow which sometimes lit up Harald's eyes.
Page 172 - IT is with our faults as with horseradish; it is terribly difficult to extirpate it from the earth in which it has once taken root; and nothing is more discouraging to the cultivator who will annihilate this weed from his ground, than to see it, so lately plucked up, shooting forth again freshly...
Page 260 - ... head peeped out, and two small white arms stretched themselves towards Susanna. With a cry of almost wild joy Susanna sprang forward, and clasped the little sister in her arms. Susanna was pale, wept and laughed, and ' knew not for some time what went on around her. But when she had collected herself, she found herself sitting on Hulda's bed, with the child folded in her arms, and over the little, light-locked head, lifted itself a manly one, with an expression of deep seriousness and gentle...
Page 99 - Riukan, which even at this day the traveller treads with fear, and which was discovered by a young maiden, strong in the courage of love. It was by this path that the beautiful Mary of Westfiordale went with light, fearless step to meet the friend of her childhood, Ejstein Halfoordsen.
Page 169 - She felt a sting in her heart ; a serpent raged in lier bosom. Driven by a nameless agonized disquiet, she hastened forth into the free air, and ascended, almost without being aware of it herself, the steep footpath up the mountain, where many a time, in calmer moments, she had admired the beautiful prospect. Great and beautiful scenes had, during the foregoing conversation, arisen before her view ; — she felt herself so little, so poor beside them. Ah! she could not once speak of the great and...

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