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" In every work regard the writer's end, Since none can compass more than they intend; And if the means be just, the conduct true, Applause, in spite of trivial faults, is due. "
Bell's Edition - Page 48
by John Bell - 1796
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The works of Alexander Pope, with notes and illustrations, by ..., Volume 2

Alexander Pope - 1847 - 488 pages
...united to th' admiring eyes ; 250 No monstrous height, or breadth, or length, appear ; The Whole at once is bold, and regular. Whoever thinks a faultless...End, 255 Since none can compass more than they intend ; COMMENTARY. Ver. 253. Whoever thirties a faultless piece to see,] He shows next [from ver. 252 to...
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The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope: To which is Prefixed a Life of the Author

Alexander Pope - 1848 - 642 pages
...edmiring eyes : 250 No monstrous height, or hreadth, or length appear : The whole at once is hold, and regular. Whoever thinks a faultless piece to see, Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall he. In every work regard the writer's end, Since none can compass more than they intend ; And if the...
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Horace: with notes by C. Girdlestone and W.A. Osborne

Quintus Horatius Flaccus - 1848 - 588 pages
...delicia. We must not expect perfection, but we may find fault with repeated errors. Compare Pope : — " Whoever thinks a faultless piece to see, Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be." — Essay, Ħi.] 349. Gravem. Aflat. Not from the want of skill in the player, but from imperfect tension...
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The poetical works of Alexander Pope. Revised and arranged expressly for the ...

Alexander Pope, William Charles Macready - 1849 - 646 pages
...comes united to the admiring eyes ; No monstrous height, or breadth, or length appear ; The whole at once is bold, and regular. Whoever thinks a faultless...Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be. In every work regard the writer's end, Since none can compass more than they intend ; And if the means...
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Stray Effusions; Or Gleanings from Nature

William Jamie - 1849 - 156 pages
...my heart will regard Thy kindness, till lie crushed and broken. The spirit of the Bard 1 PREFACE. " Whoever thinks a faultless piece to see, Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be."— Pop* AT a time when the literature of our country has teen brought to such perfection, and when the...
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Studies from the English Poets

George Frederick Graham - 1852 - 570 pages
...comes united to the admiring eyes ; 50 No monstrous height, or breadth, or length appear ; The whole at once is bold and regular. Whoever thinks a faultless...Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be. In every work regard the writer's end, 55 Since none can compass more than they intend ; And if the means...
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Guy's new speaker, selections of poetry and prose from the best writers in ...

Joseph Guy - 1852 - 458 pages
...comes united to the' admiring eyes : No monstrous height, or breadth, or length appear ; The whole at once is bold and regular. Whoever thinks a faultless...Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be. In every work regard the writer's end, Since none can compass more than they intend ; And if the means...
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Thirty-five Years in the East: Adventures, Discoveries ..., Volumes 1-2

John Martin Honigberger - 1852 - 818 pages
...work to see, Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be. In every work regard the writer's end, Since none can compass more than they intend ; And...the means be just, the conduct true, Applause, in tpite of trivial fault*, is due."—POPE. EXPLANATION OF THE PLATES. The first thirty lithographic...
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Thirty-five Years in the East: Adventures, Discoveries ..., Volumes 1-2

John Martin Honigberger - 1852 - 824 pages
...work to sec, Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be. In every work regard the writer's end, Since none can compass more than they intend ; And if the means be just, the conduct true, Applause, I'M tpite of trivial faults, is due." — POPE. EXPLANATION OF THE PLATES. The first thirty lithographic...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 92

William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, Sir John Murray (IV), Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle) - 1853 - 578 pages
...fairer, and we have no doubt a truer, apology would be found in the admission of the indulgent axiom, Whoever thinks a faultless piece to see, Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be — which, applicable as it is to all works of art, is peculiarly so to that complicated class of architectural...
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