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" I entreated a bearward one day to come down with the dogs of some four parishes, that way, and I thank him, he did ; and cried his games under Master Morose's window : till he was sent crying away, with his head made a most bleeding spectacle to the multitude. "
Notes and Queries - Page 206
1870
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A History of Advertising from the Earliest Times: Illustrated by Anecdotes ...

Henry Sampson - 1875 - 698 pages
...loves no noise," in Ben Jonson's "Silent Woman." "I entreated a beanvard one day," says the page, " to come down with the dogs of some four parishes that way, and I thank Jiim he did, and cried his game under Master Morose's window.'' And in Howard's " English Monsieur"...
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A History of the Cries of London: Ancient and Modern

Charles Hindley - 1881 - 344 pages
...his virtue would rust without action. I entreated a bearward, one day, to come down with the clogs of some four parishes that way, and I thank him he...head made a most bleeding spectacle to the multitude. And, another time, a fencer marching to his prize had his drum most tragically run through, for taking...
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Plays and Poems

Ben Jonson - 1886 - 336 pages
...exercise, to breathe him. He would grow resty else in his ease : his virtue would rust without action. I entreated a bearward, one day, to come down with...head made a most bleeding spectacle to the multitude. And, another time, a fencer marching to his prize, had his drum most tragically run through, for taking...
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The Dramatic Works and Lyrics of Ben Jonson: Selected With an Essay ...

Ben Jonson, John Addington Symonds - 1886 - 430 pages
...resty else in his ease : his virtue would rust without action. I entreated a bearward, one day, co como down with the dogs of some four parishes that way,...cried his games under master Morose's window : till he wag sent crying away, with his head made a most bleeding spectacle to the multitude. And, another time,...
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Plays and Poems

Ben Jonson - 1890 - 344 pages
...exercise, to breathe him. He would grow resty else in his ease : his virtue would rust without action. I entreated a bearward, one day, to come down with...head made a most bleeding spectacle to the multitude. And, another time, a fencer marching to his prize, had his drum most tragically run through, for taking...
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Famous Elizabethan Plays: Expurgated and Adapted for Modern Readers

Henry Macaulay Fitzgibbon - 1890 - 578 pages
...would grow resty else in his ease: his virtue would rust without action. I entreated a bearward, 1 one day, to come down with the dogs of some four parishes...head made a most bleeding spectacle to the multitude. And, another time, a fencer marching to his prize, had his drum most tragically run through, for taking...
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Ben Jonson: Volpone; or, The fox. Epicœne; or, The silent woman. The alchemist

Ben Jonson - 1894 - 478 pages
...exercise, to breathe him. He would grow resty else in his ease : his virtue Avould rust without action. I entreated a bearward one day to come down with the...head made a most bleeding spectacle to the multitude. And another time, a fencer marching to his prize had his drum most tragically run through, for taking...
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Plays and Poems

Ben Jonson - 1895 - 328 pages
...exercise, to breathe him. He would grow resty else in his ease : his virtue would rust without action. I entreated a bearward, one day, to come down with...head made a most bleeding spectacle to the multitude. And, another time, a fencer marching to his prize, had his drum most tragically run through, for taking...
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The Merry Wives of Windsor

William Shakespeare - 1904 - 354 pages
...taken from the language of the bearward. In Ben Jonson's Epicene, I. i. (408^), Clerimont's Page says : "I entreated a bearward one day to come down with...away with his head made a most bleeding spectacle." This is the Host's expression. For some of the "games," see note at I. i. 308. "Fighting at head" and...
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“The” Works of Shakespeare, Volume 24

William Shakespeare - 1904 - 324 pages
...taken from the language of the bearward. In Ben Jonson's Epicene, I. i. (4o8<5), Clerimont's Page says: "I entreated a bearward one day to come down with...away with his head made a most bleeding spectacle." This is the Host's expression. For some of the "games," see note at I. i. 308. "Fighting at head" and...
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